Caring for your Microfiber Cloths

microfiber cloths

If you watch any of our videos or read our blogs, you’ll know that we have a scandalous love affair with microfiber cloths.


Beautiful, wonderful microfiber terry cloths.
Beautiful, wonderful microfiber terry cloths.


We’ve convinced most of your to grab a few and replace your old cleaning cloths with these amazing tools.  Microfiber is one of the very best cleaning tools you’ll ever come across, and can last for up to 500 washes if cared for properly.  I also love the idea that when I use them, I am not rifling through a roll of paper towel (usually using a ton of sheets to remove all streaks and lint).  They are economical and environmentally-friendly and although they do not bio-degrade, they can be re-used 500 times, which I prefer to using paper towel.

A lot of times, we get asked how to clean them properly.  So, we put this quick little guide together for you.


Single blue terry microfiber cloth.
Single blue terry microfiber cloth.


The recommended care regime:

1) Separate cloths from other laundry items

Do this because you want to avoid the very clingy cloths from picking up lint or debris from other items like clothing or towels.  Some people opt to place their cloths in a delicates bag, that way they have less exposure to potential clingy lint during the washing process.

2) Add a small amount of laundry detergent, ideally a liquid detergent to the laundry

Just plain detergent, nothing fancy or expensive.  The purer, the better.  Use a proportionate amount of detergent according to the size of the load.

3) Launder with cold water

Nothing really to expand on this, just use cold water.

4) Tumble dry on low or no heat

You want to use a dryer if possible, with no anti-static products.  Static cling is one of the key benefits of microfiber, so you want to generate and store as much of it as you can during the drying process.  Too much heat can ‘burn’ the material, so be sure to use low or no-heat drying cycles.

Do not:

1) Use the cloths to clean up grease, oil, or polish.  It cannot be removed from the cloth

Your cloths will have grease stains and flattened patches.  For greasy or dirty jobs, or jobs involving polish, stick to cotton or paper.

2) Wash using hot water

Heat ruins the fibers, and repeated exposure to heat will render the cloth useless.

3) Wash using fabric softener or dryer sheets

Fabric softener ‘clogs’ the fibers and binds them together.  This reduces their absorbency and ability to wipe away liquids and trap dust.  If you do this, you’ll see that the cloths performs similar to a cotton washcloth…not very well.

4) Wash with bleach

Bleach will also ruin the integrity of the cloth, meaning it will wear faster and not work as well. A clear no-no!

flat-weave glass cleaning microfiber cloth
flat-weave glass cleaning microfiber cloth

So there you have it, simple care tips to keep your microfiber cloths lasting long and strong for you!

Learn how to care for these cloths, which can last you for 500 washes if you treat them right!


  1. Can the clothes break down and deposit fibres? Can the fibres break down? And what if people have a nylon allergy, or an allergy to one of the other plastic’s used? Would this make the clothes a no go, in a house where someone had such allergies?

  2. Micro-fiber cloth that is made in Korea suggests hot water wash (not over 140 degrees). With good micro-fiber cloths you can just shake out debris like tree leaves or grass clippings. Cheap micro-fiber (made in China) catches and holds on to everything and you can’t shake it out or wash it out. To know if you have a good micro fiber cloth, run it across your fingers and it will not snag on dry rough patches of skin. Cheap micro fiber will catch and pull on rough dry skin. There is no comparison between the two. Good micro-fiber made in Korea is hard to find. I order mine from The Rag Co. and when you view them it says “Korea”.

  3. I have bleached and used hot water (sanitize cycle on washer). Does this mean I should replace all my cloths as they will not work as well?

  4. If you say “Heat ruins the fibers, and repeated exposure to heat will render the cloth useless” then why is it OK to use the dryer? Wouldn’t it be better to line dry them?

  5. These clothes should really only be used as a final touch to remove finger-prints and the streaks caused by skin oils from monitors and glass windows and maybe for getting dust off of things. For everything else you should just be using regular clothes.

    • You definitely have the right idea. Microfiber cloths are good for only certain jobs and should not be used for others, unless of course you don’t mind spreading around some nasty whatever all over stuff. You will not find a cloth in my kitchen that has not first met the sanitizing process of hot water and chlorine bleach.

  6. Well, darn. I was all excited to buy some microfiber cloths after watching so many of your videos. Then I read this article and see that they do not biodegrade. That’s a no-go for me. I guess I will stick to cotton cloths. I know you love microfiber, but I would be grateful if you could briefly mention other ways to clean as well. For example, I see that you mention using coffee filters for cleaning glass. More tips like that so that we have options for whatever reason.

  7. I have a bunch of what looks like small particles of what looks like wood stuck in my cloths even after washing, although I haven’t wiped raw wood with my clothes. Is there some way to relax the fibers to get them to release this?

  8. You mention not bleaching or hot water. Do you use microfibre for kitchen and bathroom cleaning? If so, how do you keep them sanitary?

  9. “3) Wash using fabric softener or dryer sheets”

    Don’t you mean DON’T wash using fabric softener or dryer sheets?

  10. I’ve heard that you can buy a “brush” to clean out linen pieces that have attached to microfiber rags/cloths. Is this true? Where can you get one because i can’t find it anywhere!

  11. Hi Melissa
    I found a detergent that is formulated specifically for Microfibre cloths. It is low sudsing and supposed to help the fibre release dirt better than anything else and leave them most free from clogging fillers. I used it at work and it seemed to work very well. I bought a large quantity of cloths and waited to wash them all together.
    This article was very good and very clear. As microfiber picks up germs, I did wash my cloths in hot water now and then and they seemed not to suffer too badly. I dried them on cool.
    I look forward to checking out more of your website!

  12. I just have a question in regards to how you dry your cloths. If you do not own a dryer can you still use the good old natural sun to do the job? I know it doesn’t produce much static but it is really the only way I can dry things. Also I wanted to ask what was the best the way was to remove collected dust from the microfiber cloths. The work a wonder to removing dust, but come trying to remove the dust from the cloths before washing them, or even just washing them without doing anything, some of the dust just seems to stay. Is this normal?

    I haven’t been using them for very long, it has only been since coming across your cleaning videos on youtube that I had even heard of them. I have found they work such a wonder and am in the process of replacing majority of my old teatowels with these amazing cloths and only keeping ones for those jobs which microfibers aren’t suited for (aka the barbeque).

    • Hi Anita,
      to answer you about removing dust, I pick or shake off the larger dust bits or other things and then I wash the cloth by hand in the laundry tub or sink. For this I use plain natural dish soap, or a bar of laundry soap or plain Ivory bar soap and rinse very well. I found this best for getting them pre cleaned. I hang them to dry and collect them in a bag till I have enough for a small load for the washing machine.
      it takes work but I like getting them nice and clean.

  13. I am new fan, and I am excited to be. I have watched a plethora of your videos. I am moving out of my apartment soon, and I am on a budget. I have to clean up my old apartment before moving into my new one, and I watched a lot of your videos to find out the most affordable, safe, and effective way to clean my apartment. Thank you so much!

  14. *High* Heat ruins microfiber. No washing machine I know of reaches the 400F or higher that damages these fibers. A normal washing machine runs about 120F which is perfect for cleaning these fibers without even slightly damaging them. I absolutely recommend running these through at “hot” on a washing machine.

  15. I use these towels with auto wax and related products. Spray them down with a citrus degreaser and possibly pre-soak the nasty towels to dissolve heavy buildup. Lightly brush the stains with a (soft bristle) fingernail brush and wash as directed above.

  16. Hi Melissa! Can you hang dry these cloths? Also, can you make a page where you list links to the cleaning tools you use like the microfiber cloths, the window squigee, scraper etc.? Or is there already a page like this? I didn’t seem to see anything.
    Thanks for all the advice!!

    • Fabric soften will wash out. You can rewash the cloths well in hot water only. or dip them in a large pot of boiling water for a few seconds and wring out well. If you have further questions there are resources search Nordic ultramicrofibers

  17. Many years ago I sold, “The Cloth,” it was the initial introduction of microfiber cloths to the market before 3M and other companies caught on to these fabulous cloths. The thing I wanted to point out is we were always told NEVER wash in the washing machine and especially with fabric softener or bleach. It was always best to wash by hand using dish detergent preferably Dawn liquid. I used one cloth that I cut in half (half in the bathroom and half in the kitchen) for over 10 years before having to replace it. If washed immediately after a dirty job, you can keep them almost stain free for a long time. I don’t think it is possible with the ones on the market now but if you ever get a chance to buy the original do so … well worth it.

  18. Hi Melissa, I watched your video on hand washing dishes and was wondering if you can recommend any particular brand of microfiber waffle weave drying towell. I live in the US (rather than Canada), but maybe I could find your recommended brand online.
    Thanks so much, Renee Blanchard

  19. Hi Melissa. I love your site. I have a question about vinegar and microfiber. I make my own laundry detergent and use vinegar as a fabric softener. Is that safe for these cloths or should I leave the vinegar our of the dispenser?

  20. Hi, Malissa. I didn’t know the benefits of micro fibre clothes! They are fabulous! I’m going to start using them more often even in the bathroom for the tub. You say that you have to use cold water to wash them in. But how can I remove bacteria from the cloths in cold water?

  21. I just bought these – thank you so muc- someone pinned on Pinterest and I am so thankful that they did. I would have ruined the cloths for certain. Fantastic !

  22. Hi Malissa. You have convinced me too to buy microfibre cloth for dusting. LOL.
    May I ask how do you take care of white cloths like white shirts, white cotton pillow covers etc. I just wash them with liquid detergent in machine but eventually after some washes I could notice it turning into yellowish pale colour. How can I retain the same original white colour? Thanks very much.

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